Woodie Fryman Obituary, Death, Funeral And Visitation

Woodie Fryman Obituary, Death, Funeral And Visitation

Woodie Fryman Obituary, Death Cause – During his time with the Expos, Fryman pitched both in the starting rotation and in relief. He pitched 157 innings, had a record of 9-12, a 3.32 earned run average, three saves, seven complete games, three shutouts, 118 strikeouts, and 68 walks. He walked 68 batters and struck out 118. He had three saves. His number of strikeouts compared to walks was 118 to 68. Despite the fact that he did not make his debut in Major League Baseball until 1966, when he was already 26 years old, Fryman pitched in the major leagues for a total of 18 seasons, during which he won 141 games, recorded 58 saves, and was chosen for two All-Star teams. During his time in the major leagues, Fryman was also selected for two All-Star teams.

1975 was the year in which the man who had spent his whole life up to that point in Ewing, Kentucky finally donned an Expos uniform for the first time. When Fryman was relocated to Montreal over the winter for catcher Terry Humphrey and pitcher Tom Walker, the Expos were having a lot of difficulties winning games at the time. Fryman was traded to Montreal at a time when the Expos were having a lot of trouble winning games.

In 2005, he was inducted into the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame before passing away in 2011. He had reached the age of seventy when he passed away. In 2005, he was honored by being inducted into the hall of fame as a member of the institution. Willie McCovey, who would go on to be inducted into the Hall of Fame years later, said that Fryman was one of the toughest left-handed pitchers in the National League during Fryman’s rookie season in 1966. This was Fryman’s first year pitching in the National League. McCovey referred to Fryman as “one of the toughest left-handed pitchers in the National League.” Fryman was a left-handed pitcher.

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